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Reuters, AP

London- One of Britain’s greatest literary figures, American-born poet, critic and dramatist T. S. Eliot, died at his London home last night. He was 76.

Mr. Eliot, who won, the Nobel Prize for literature in 1948, lived London since World War I. He was one of the creators of modern poetry and is perhaps best remembered for a line that has passed by now into common usage-“this is the way the world ends….not with a bans but a whimper.”

Mr Eliot, a native of St. Louis, Missouri, spent most of his adult life in Britain.

Mr Thomas Stearns Eliot suffered a heart attack aboard the liner Queen Mary in June 1956 but recovered and married his secretary the following January when he was 68 years old.

His bride, 30-year-old Valerie Fletcher, was his second wife.

His two most successful plays were Murder in the Cathedral, a dramatization of the murder of Archbishop Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral, and The Cocktail Party, the story of a psychiatrist who helped people find peace of mind.

Never a prolific writer, Mr Eliot nevertheless was considered a perfect commentator on both poetry and prose and the theatre.

He relinquished his U.S. citizenship in 1927 and became a British subject.

Mr Eliot celebrated the loneliness of modern man in his poetry. In his later years his critical essays were more and more concerned with problems of Christianity. He was an outspoken member of the Church of England and one of its leading defenders.

Long ago be save his three leading ideals in life as classicism in poetry, Anglo-Catholicism a religion and Royalism in politics.

In private life, he was a director of Faber and Faber, one of England’s leading publishers. Daily he went to his office, tall, slender and stooped, in a dark suit that made him look like a banker.

He avoided London’s literary whirl and was a churchwarden in his parish in sedate London district of South Kensington.

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